Zoom sur… Zoom on… Ramana Maharshi

Zoom sur… Ramana Maharshi

Ramana Maharshi est un des maîtres de l’Advaita Vedānta né le 30 décembre 1879 et mort le 14 avril 1950. Son enseignement est essentiellement centré sur le Soi et la question « Qui suis-je ?« . Il est considéré comme l’un des grands maîtres traditionnels de cette école philosophique du Vedānta.

Selon Ramana Maharshi le corps physique auquel nous nous identifions est sans importance. Seul le Soi qui est la pure conscience d’être doit-être trouvé grâce à l’enquête incessante: « Qui-suis-je ? ».

Le soi est silence, imperceptible par les sens et inconcevable par l’intellect. C’est cette présence absolue qui seule Est et demeure immuable. Tandis que tout se forme, se transforme et se déforme dans l’univers, « Cela » ne meurt pas, ne nait pas et demeure en chacun. Chacun de nous répète sans cesse « Je », à toute heure du jour, sans s’interroger sur la source de ce sentiment d’être et en l’attribuant au corps, en raison d’une investigation superficielle de la question. Or c’est tout le contraire, la « Conscience en Soi », c’est-à-dire en elle-même, ce que nous pourrions appeler la « Conscienceté », indépendamment de la « conscience de », est en vérité la source invisible de tout. Cette Réalisation peut se faire au cours de l’existence et met fin à la souffrance qui n’est autre que l’effet de l’ignorance de qui nous sommes.

Le Maharshi exhortait tous ceux qui l’écoutaient à se poser inlassablement la question « Qui suis-je ? », indiquant ainsi la direction que le chercheur doit prendre pour couper la racine même de l’Illusion (Mâyâ) associée à l’identification avec le « Je » (Jiva ou encore Ahamkara).

Il est le plus grand mystique de l’Inde du XXe siècle. Les pères Henri Le Saux et Jules Monchanin ont reçu le darshan de Ramana Maharishi en 1950, peu avant sa mort.

Enseignements

Selon Ramana Maharshi le corps physique auquel nous nous identifions est sans importance. Seul le Soi qui est la pure conscience d’être doit-être trouvé grâce à l’enquête incessante : « Qui-suis-je?  » (Atma Vichara).

Le soi est silence, imperceptible par les sens et inconcevable par l’intellect. C’est cette présence absolue qui seule Est et demeure immuable. Tandis que tout se forme, se transforme et se déforme dans l’univers, « Cela » ne meurt pas, ne nait pas et demeure en chacun. Chacun de nous répète sans cesse « Je », à toute heure du jour, sans s’interroger sur la source de ce sentiment d’être et en l’attribuant au corps, en raison d’une investigation superficielle de la question. Or c’est tout le contraire, la « Conscience en Soi« , c’est-à-dire en elle-même, ce que nous pourrions appeler la « Conscienceté », indépendamment de la « conscience de », est en vérité la source invisible de tout. Cette Réalisation peut se faire au cours de l’existence et met fin à la souffrance qui n’est autre que l’effet de l’ignorance de qui nous sommes.

Le Maharshi exhortait tous ceux qui l’écoutaient à se poser inlassablement la question « Qui suis-je? », indiquant ainsi la direction que le chercheur doit prendre pour couper la racine même de l’Illusion (Mâyâ) associée à l’identification avec le « Je » (Jiva ou encore Ahamkara).

Il est le plus grand mystique de l’Inde du XXe siècle. Les pères Henri Le Saux et Jules Monchanin ont reçu le darshan de Ramana Maharishi en 1950, peu avant sa mort.

Source : Wikipedia

—–

Zoom on… Ramana Maharshi

Sri Ramana Maharshi  (December 30, 1879 – April 14, 1950), born Venkataraman Iyer, was a Hindu spiritual master (« jnani »). He was born to a Tamil-speaking Brahmin family in Tiruchuzhi, Tamil Nadu. After supposedly having attained liberation at the age of 16, he left home for Arunachala, a mountain considered sacred by Hindus, at Tiruvannamalai, and lived there for the rest of his life. Although born a Brahmin, he declared himself an « Atiasrami », a Sastraic state of non-attachment to anything in life and beyond all caste restrictions. The ashram that grew around him, Sri Ramana Ashram, is situated at the foothill of Arunchala, to the west to the pilgrimage town of Tiruvannamalai.

Sri Ramana maintained that the purest form of his teachings was the powerful silence which radiated from his presence and quieted the minds of those attuned to it. He gave verbal teachings only for the benefit of those who could not understand his silence (or, perhaps, could not understand how to attain the silent state).[2] His verbal teachings were said to flow from his direct experience of Atman as the only existing reality.[3] When asked for advice, he recommended self-enquiry as the fastest path to moksha. Though his primary teaching is associated with Non-dualism, Advaita Vedanta, and Jnana yoga, he recommended Bhakti to those he saw were fit for it, and gave his approval to a variety of paths and practices.

Teachings

Sri Ramana’s teachings about self-enquiry, the practice he is most widely associated with, have been classified as the Path of Knowledge (Jnana marga) among the Indian schools of thought. Though his teaching is consistent with and generally associated with Hinduism, the Upanishads and Advaita Vedanta, there are some differences with the traditional Advaitic school, and Sri Ramana gave his approval to a variety of paths and practices from various religions.

His earliest teachings are documented in the book Nan Yar?(Who am I?), first written in Tamil. The original book was published by Sri Pillai, although the essay version of the book (Sri Ramana Nutrirattu) prepared by Sri Ramana is considered definitive as unlike the original it had the benefit of his revision and review. A careful translation with notes is available in English as ‘The Path of Sri Ramana, Part One’ by Sri Sadhu Om, one of the direct disciples of Sri Ramana. Selections from this definitive version follow:

  • As all living beings desire to be happy always, without misery, as in the case of everyone there is observed supreme love for one’s self, and as happiness alone is the cause for love, in order to gain that happiness which is one’s nature and which is experienced in the state of deep sleep where there is no mind, one should know one’s self. For that, the path of knowledge, the inquiry of the form « Who am I? », is the principal means.
  • Knowledge itself is ‘I’. The nature of (this) knowledge is existence-consciousness-bliss.
  • What is called mind is a wondrous power existing in Self. It projects all thoughts. If we set aside all thoughts and see, there will be no such thing as mind remaining separate; therefore, thought itself is the form of the mind. Other than thoughts, there is no such thing as the world.
  • Of all the thoughts that rise in the mind, the thought ‘I’ is the first thought.
  • That which rises in this body as ‘I’ is the mind. If one enquires ‘In which place in the body does the thought ‘I’ rise first?’, it will be known to be in the heart [spiritual heart is ‘two digits to the right from the centre of the chest’]. Even if one incessantly thinks ‘I’, ‘I’, it will lead to that place (Self)’
  • The mind will subside only by means of the enquiry ‘Who am I?’. The thought ‘Who am I?’, destroying all other thoughts, will itself finally be destroyed like the stick used for stirring the funeral pyre.
  • If other thoughts rise, one should, without attempting to complete them, enquire, ‘To whom did they arise?’, it will be known ‘To me’. If one then enquires ‘Who am I?’, the mind (power of attention) will turn back to its source. By repeatedly practising thus, the power of the mind to abide in its source increases.
  • The place where even the slightest trace of the ‘I’ does not exist, alone is Self.
  • Self itself is God

Sri Ramana warned against considering self-enquiry as an intellectual exercise. Properly done, it involves fixing the attention firmly and intensely on the feeling of ‘I’, without thinking. It is perhaps more helpful to see it as ‘Self-attention’ or ‘Self-abiding’ (cf. Sri Sadhu Om – The Path of Sri Ramana Part I). The clue to this is in Sri Ramana’s own death experience when he was 16. After raising the question ‘Who am I?’ he « turned his attention very keenly towards himself » (cf. description above). Attention must be fixed on the ‘I’ until the feeling of duality disappears.

Although he advocated self-enquiry as the fastest means to realization, he also recommended the path of bhakti and self-surrender (to one’s Deity or Guru) either concurrently or as an adequate alternative, which would ultimately converge with the path of self-enquiry.

Source : Wikipedia

  1. Poster un commentaire

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Connexion à %s